Seaview Business Association

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2000 pollen samples studies

Hutt News, February 7, 2017

 

Joe Prebble of GNS Science has used fossilised pollen to look at climate change over the last 34 million years.

Fossilised tree pollen is giving us a better understanding of climate change over the last 34 million years.

Moore than 2000 samples of fossilised tree pollen held at GNS Science in Lower Hutt have been studied to get a picture of the climate over the past 34 million years, covering a period when New Zealand was six to eight degrees Celsius warmer then today.

The research, published this month in Earth and Planetary Science Letters, is based on fossilised tree pollen that scientists have extracted from rocks over the last 60 years.

By comparing the pollen found in the rocks to the modern distribution of closely-related trees, the scientists were able to reconstruct changes in air temperature and rainfall. (more…)

Seaview business group comes of age

The organisation set up as a collective voice for the Wellington region’s largest industrial zone has a change of name. The Seaview Working Group is now the Seaview Business Association, an identity that reflects and acknowledges the goals achieved by the membership since formation in 2010.

The Seaview Working Group began as small group of business owners concerned about environmental issues around Seaview. They also saw a need to spread the word about Seaview’s importance to the region, which led to the popular ‘Spotlight on Seaview’ open days.  Strong support for the group proved a local need has clearly been met. And with real progress made in the tasks the members set themselves, the time has come for a permanent, more inclusive body to represent the Seaview business community.
Association member Bruce Whiley of Titan Cranes Ltd. says,
“As a name, Seaview Business Association is more fitting for an organisation that now has so many people involved who are keen to make changes for the better. There’s a real will in Seaview to progress both the area itself and the businesses that operate here.”
Since inception the group has been actively involved in initiatives concerning the Seaview/Gracefield area. These include flood protection talks and regular networking events for local enterprises. The group has also played an important role linking the area’s business owners with local government, schools and the general public, and supporting and encouraging participation in such events as the Hutt STEMM Festival.

The association plans to continue to expand its scope under the new banner Seaview Business Association.

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Big Lower Hutt office and warehouse

NZ Hearld, October 7, 2016

The big office and warehouse property for sale in Seaview, Lower Hutt.

The big office and warehouse property for sale in Seaview, Lower Hutt.

A large office and warehouse property with a long-term lease in place to national logistics operator Cardinal Logistics is for sale in Wellington’s popular Seaview industrial area.

“Competition for space here is strong, especially among logistics and distribution companies which require good transport connections,” says Tim Julian of Colliers International who, with colleagues Andrew Hooper and Greg Goldfinch, is marketing 195 Gracefield Rd, Lower Hutt, for sale by deadline private treaty closing on November 1.

“Seaview is a prime spot that is experiencing particularly high demand from industrial occupiers,” Julian says. “And Gracefield Rd is highly sought-after among businesses owing to its easy access to the motorway and port.”

The large property has a building area of 9714sq m and occupies 1.4ha freehold site.

“It provides functional, multi-purpose industrial accommodation with excellent truck access through the property,” Hooper says.

“This is an excellent facility with ample warehouse space and a compact office component. It has several features making it ideal for distribution and logistics occupiers, including high stud warehousing and a fully covered, drive-through canopy area.”

The main high-stud warehouse of 7531sq m is split into two parts by the drive-through canopy, which extends right through the site and provides access to both sides of the warehouse via roller doors. The modern building has offices and amenities over two levels and a warehouse stud height of 8.5m.

An older building to the eastern side of the complex provides a further 1201sq m of warehouse space with direct access into the new warehouse, and additional offices. Also on the property are 32 car parks.

The tenant, Cardinal Logistics is a New Zealand owned and operated business that was founded in 1992 and is now one of the country’s leading and fastest-growing logistics companies, specialising in distribution and storage solutions. The company focuses on grocery products and other consumer goods and also has warehouses in Auckland and Christchurch.

Hooper says the lease to Cardinal Logistics extends to 2026 and will generate $1,119,450 in net annual rental income from November 2.

“This property generates a solid income stream which will be appealing to investors looking to increase their holdings in commercial property. Demand from investors in the commercial property market is very strong at the moment, which has been largely driven by a low bank interest rate environment.”

Julian says the building’s size means likely buyers include listed property companies, real estate investment trusts, syndicators and larger passive investors.

“The long lease, modern building and prime location mean this property will appeal to buyers based around New Zealand looking for sizable, functional and well-located assets to further diversify their portfolios.”

The property is located 21km from Wellington Airport, 6km from State Highway 2 and 15km from CentrePort Wellington.

“Seaview is a very popular transport and distribution hub that has undergone some modernisation recently,” says Julian.

“Several older buildings are currently being refurbished to provide industrial accommodation that better meets modern requirements.  With many tenants reluctant to move further up the Hutt Valley, further refurbishment of older stock is likely in the precinct as tenants and owner occupiers compete for limited space in the Seaview precinct.”

Higher demand for industrial space in Wellington has pushed the vacancy rate to a record low 3.6 per cent, according to Colliers International’s latest survey. There is now less than 100,000sq m of industrial space available – well below the 9 per cent vacancy recorded in late 2012.

(more…)

Designer for canines now offers daycare

Hutt News, September 20, 2016

Anna Sutherland, holding Zoe, with her partner Jesse McLean, said part of the reason she started Pucci was so their dog Riley had a great place to go during the work week.

Anna Sutherland, holding Zoe, with her partner Jesse McLean, said part of the reason she started Pucci was so their dog Riley had a great place to go during the work week.

A fashion designer for dogs has turned her attention to daycare for the canines.

Anna Sutherland’s business, Pucci, shares the same name as her fashion line, which is a play on Gucci, and includes bandanas and tops for canines.

Sutherland said she followed her high school friend’s into studying fashion design, despite wanting to be a vet.

She went on to study vet nursing but the self-described softie found being around surgery too hard so she took those skills and those she learnt through managing a pet store into her new business.

Before she opened in July she made the industrial building on Gracefield Road in Seaview homely by using bright greens and pinks. (more…)

Friends of Waiwhetu Stream reach important milestone with 20,000 plants

Stuff, 11th September, 2016

The Friends of Waiwhetu Stream have removed more than 500,000 Cape Pond-weeds. From left Merilyn Merritt, Nic Vipond, Allan White, Andrew Campbell-Stokes, Franz Hubmann, Matthew Lear and Chrissie Burt in 2014.

The Friends of Waiwhetu Stream have removed more than 500,000 Cape Pond-weeds. From left Merilyn Merritt, Nic Vipond, Allan White, Andrew Campbell-Stokes, Franz Hubmann, Matthew Lear and Chrissie Burt in 2014.

The old adage about it being a tough job but someone has to do it, applies to the Friends of the Waiwhetu Stream.

The Friends are responsible for 9 kilometres of the stream that once had the tag of the most polluted waterway in New Zealand.

In 2009 the regional council spent $6 million removing a toxic sludge of heavy metals and poisons from the stream. Reports at the time said that the stream was so toxic it once caught fire.

The Friends subsequently began a project to bring the stream back to life by removing weeds and rubbish, as well as planting natives along its banks.

They recently achieved a significant milestone with the planting of the 20,000th plant. (more…)

Bylaw to look at alcohol-free zones in Hutt

Hutt News, August 9, 2016

A proposed bylaw shouldn’t stop people taking an unfinished bottle of wine home from a BYO restaurant.

Hutt City Council decided to consult on its draft Alcohol in Public Places Bylaw at its full council meeting on august 1.

The bylaw would impose alcohol-free zones between 9pm and 5am and allow for areas to be deemed alcohol-free at all times if it could be proven there was alcohol-related public disorder there. (more…)

Sculpture has Krispie appeal

Hutt News, August 2, 2016

A new use for stones from the former Lower Hutt Griffins factory has been found.

The granite stones, which were used to grind coconut for Krispie biscuits, are being carved into a sculpture by Tauranga based Barry Te Whatu and Sonny Davis of Waiwhetu Marae.

It will become part of the Waiwhetu Sculpture Walk the E Tu Awakairangi Hutt Public Art Trust is developing.

Griffins Sculpture

 

Barry Te Whatu and Sonny Davis are sculpting grinding stones from the Griffins factory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Frustration with boy-racers spur Seaview firms to call for car ban

The Dominion Post, May 20th 2016,  

Skid marks streaked across Hutt Park Rd outside Label and Litho in Gracefield.

Skid marks streaked across Hutt Park Rd outside Label and Litho in Gracefield.

Businesses sick of boy-racers want a ban on alcohol and cars covering as much of Seaview and Gracefield as possible.

The Seaview Working Group is urging the Hutt City Council to consider bringing in by-laws that would ban alcohol and non-commercial vehicles from the area “so that only people that need to be in the area for work can be there”.

The industrial area near Petone in Lower Hutt often attracts car enthusiasts looking for quiet streets at night.

Hutt Park Rd, right outside group chairman Angus Kincaid’s business, looks like it has been scribbled over with burnt rubber.

In a move that would give police more muscle to deal with the problem, the group made a submission to the council’s annual plan committee earlier this month.

“When these large gatherings happen in Seaview, they leave behind large amounts of shredded rubber on the streets, general rubbish, glass bottles, burn-out marks, graffiti, urine, and vomit,” the group’s submission said.

“Of particular concern, is a small number of businesses that run shifts in the affected areas and the staff safety at the end of these shifts.”

Kincaid was assaulted outside his work early one Saturday in 2013.

He had gone to talk to a group of boy racers about vandalism when he was attacked and was knocked out for 20 seconds.

The road was smeared with burnout marks, and a homemade start line was painted on the road.

A statement from the group said it was too early to provide further comment while they were still in discussion with council staff and police.

Acting Hutt Valley area prevention manager inspector Tracey Thompson issued a brief response emphasising police are working with the council, businesses and residents “to disrupt this behaviour in Seaview”.

“This is an issue that we all need to address… Strategies that contribute to alcohol harm prevention and Illegal street racing remain a priority.”

Legislation that came into effect in 2009 including the Sentencing (Vehicle Confiscation) Amendment Act allows for the destruction of cars whose owners had committed a third offence.

Seaview’s Macaulay Metals site was where the first boy-racer car was crushed in 2012.

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Thirst-buster unveiled

Hutt News, April 5, 2016

Allan Brown, left, and Seaview Marina manager Alan McLellan watch as Wellington City Councillor Sarah Free holds the lever down to give a drink to the creator of the prototype water fountain for the Great Harbour Way cycle/walkway, Carl Longstaff of Metal Art Ltd.

Allan Brown, left, and Seaview Marina manager Alan McLellan watch as Wellington City Councillor Sarah Free holds the lever down to give a drink to the creator of the prototype water fountain for the Great Harbour Way cycle/walkway, Carl Longstaff of Metal Art Ltd.

Adults, kids and their four-legged friends have been catered for in the design of a drinking water fountain for the Great harbour Way.

A prototype of the hardwood and metal fountain, with arcs of water triggered at two height levels and a dog drink bowl at the base, was officially unveiled at Seaview Marina on Wednesday.

Allan Brown, who for more than eight years has been lobbying for the 70km cycleway and walkway right around the Wellington harbour edge and sections of coastline at either end, said in 10 years’ time there might be as many as 35 of the drinking fountains dotted along the route. (more…)

Masterpet puts the bite on John Key

Hutt News, March 29, 2016

Masterpet Opening

The Prime Minister is used to being chewed over by critics. On Wednesday he was face to face with a Key that suffers real bites.

John Key was presented with a rubber chew toy in his likeness when he opened the new $8 million headquarters and distribution centre of award-winning business Masterpet in Gracefield, Lower Hutt.

The Prime Minister remembered an earlier Masterpet pet chew toy in the likeness of former PM Helen Clark, which he enjoyed watching being demolished by a dog.

He also joked about the pecking order in his household, with his wife Bronagh at the top, followed by the cat Moon beam Smokey Fluffy Key, then the rest of the family.  He said he came last.

Masterpet moved into their 7245 square metre warehouse, with 762sqm of office space more than 12 months ago but chief executive Sean Duggan said the management team really wanted Key to be part of the official opening. (more…)